FAQ

We believe in all forms of communication

We have compiled below some of the answers to the questions that we have received from our customers over the years.
 
Why Ccaps Translation and Localization?
What is internationalization?
What is localization engineering?
These acronyms drive me crazy! What is TEP?
What about DTP?
What is the difference between proofreading and editing?
My assistant speaks Portuguese. Can he translate my sales brochure?
Do you often work with native speakers?
How is your vendor selection process?
And how do you guarantee quality?
What industries do you serve?
Do you translate on weekends and public holidays?
Do you charge for translations based on the source or target word count?
OK. When do you charge by the hour then?
But why do you charge for project management?
Do you charge minimum fees?
And what about rush fees?
You mentioned language assets. What does that mean?
Is translation memory a fancy name for machine translation?
Back to the acronyms… What is a TMS?
Wait, what is MT?
And what about MT PE?
Do you use Google Translator?
How do you make sure my confidential information is secure?
Voice over, subtitling, dubbing and captioning… I am confused! Which one do I need?
What is the difference between consecutive, simultaneous and whispered interpretation?
How does telephone interpreting work?
Do you provide certified translations?
 
 

Why Ccaps Translation and Localization?

Translation is only one of several elements of localization, which is the process of adapting a product or content to a specific locale or market. Sometimes referred to as L10N (where 10 stands for the number of letters between the first L and the last N), the localization process may also include:

  • Modifying content to suit the tastes and consumption habits of other markets
  • Adapting graphics to target markets
  • Converting to local requirements (such as currencies and units of measure)
  • Adapting design and layout to fit translated text
  • Using proper local formats for dates, addresses, and phone numbers
  • Addressing local regulations and legal requirements

 

What is internationalization?

The main purpose of internationalization (also known as I18N, following the same logic as L10N) is to make sure that the source content is ready to go into multiple languages. Internationalization primarily refers to how software code is written to ensure that versions beyond the original language version can be created correctly, less expensively, and with greater ease. This means I18N occurs at the beginning of content and product development, not after the content is ready for translation. There are many benefits to I18N, including: easier adaptation of software applications (or other content) to multiple locales; reduced time and cost for localization; single, internationalized source code for all versions of the product; simpler maintenance; improved quality and code architecture; reduced overall cost of ownership of the multiple versions of the product and adherence to international standards.
 

What is localization engineering?

Localization engineering covers a multitude of tasks but has a single goal: to release high quality software applications, web sites, multimedia material and online help systems to international markets. Localization engineering is one of the most critical jobs in the process, as it is one of the first client touch points when it comes to actual media or files. Content that is targeted for translation must be distributed to translators in a format they can work using Computer Assisted Translation (CAT) tools (a process typically called “pre-processing”). Then the translated content must be converted back into the original format in a process called “post-processing.”
 

These acronyms drive me crazy! What is TEP?

TEP refers to the three most common steps of a translation project: Translation, Editing and Proofreading. These three steps are the essence of every high quality translation project.
 

What is the difference between proofreading and editing?

Proofreading is a process whereby the text is being scanned for grammar, syntax and spelling errors. This process typically involves much the same correction as a secondary school teacher would perform on a written test. The meaning of words and terminology is irrelevant here, as the job focuses only on the correctness of the text. Editing concentrates less on the form and more on the terminology. The editor must make sure that the correct terminology was used by researching each term that raises a doubt, or those terms that are unknown to her. This typically involves research, whether online or in specialized dictionaries, accompanied by recommended corrections.
 

What about DTP?

In our industry, Desktop Publishing (abbreviated DTP) is the reproduction in the target document of the same page layout of the source document, whether it is for online or printed materials. Click here to learn more about what we can offer in terms of tasks, tools and file formats. Please note that we will always ask for the source document; mainly because working with PDF files can cost up to 30% more than working with the source files that generated the PDF in the first place. Due to the need to extract text and make the file editable for translation, it will also take us more time to complete the task. Finally, depending on the complexity of the graphics and the fonts embedded in the file, they may not look exactly like the original. Therefore, try to have the source files available, regardless of their format or the platform in which they were created.
 

My assistant speaks Portuguese. Can he translate my sales brochure?

The main difference between amateur and professional translations is the quality of the output. Although your secretary might do a good job translating the fax you just received (especially if you have an urgent need), he probably lacks the skills and experience of a trained linguist, who will be qualified to best convey the message in another language. Additionally, the language assets developed by Ccaps, such as glossaries and style guides (see below), are thoroughly followed by our translators to ensure consistency across multiple translations.
 

Do you often work with native speakers?

All Ccaps translators must be native speakers of the target language and preferably live in the locale of the language variant into which they translate. They must also have at least five years of experience in the translation industry and proven background in the field of their expertise.
 

How does your vendor selection process work?

Once the resume of a potential candidate has been analyzed by the Ccaps Vendor Manager, the candidate undergoes an initial test. From the 10 subject matters available, they are asked to choose three samples to translate and one sample to review. A language specialist analyzes the tests and provides the candidate with a score, based on our proprietary language quality assurance system. Candidates who fail the test are immediately rejected, but are provided with a thorough feedback and can try the test again after six months. Successful candidates enter our database for a probationary period and are only definitely approved once they have completed a short paid translation.
 

And how do you guarantee quality?

As one of our corporate values, quality is a top priority at Ccaps. Our proprietary Language Quality Assurance (LQA) system is designed to early detect and prevent language quality issues that might impact your project. Application of standard and custom style guides and glossaries to all our translation projects adds an extra layer of quality assurance to all projects. In addition, all resources, whether individuals or companies, are constantly assessed and monitored with the Ccaps LQA system, which provides evaluation reports and detailed feedback on individual projects and more complex biannual evaluations. These evaluations take into consideration not only the translator’s capacity as a qualified language expert, but also their availability and responsiveness, cost efficiency, communication and teamwork skills. Finally, our rates include one round of corrections free of charge and in our service agreement we establish the terms of our service provision, including penalties and corrective measures. Ask your project manager about the Ccaps LQA system and we will be happy to share more details.
 

What industries do you serve?

Ccaps provides software localization, marketing and technical translation, desktop publishing, multimedia localization and beyond to clients in an array of industries: IT (Software & Hardware), Telecommunications, Marketing, Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP), Business & Finance, Gaming, Oil & Gas, Legal and more. Please refer to our Media Kit for more information on which verticals we specialize in.
 

Do you translate on weekends and public holidays?

Normally we don’t. Extraordinary requests will be evaluated on a case-to-case basis by your Project Manager, and will ultimately depend on project urgency, staff and resource pool availability. Please refer to our Calendar to learn more about local holidays and contact your PM or sales representative if you need additional info.
 

Do you charge for translations based on the source or target word count?

Source. Always. By charging per source word, we can provide you with an accurate quote up-front, and you know exactly how much you will be paying before we even start working. In addition, because English is a “compact” language, translations into Portuguese and Spanish can increase the text length in up to 20%, and you wouldn’t want to pay for that, right?
 

OK. When do you charge by the hour then?

At Ccaps, translation costs are always based on the source word (see above). Other services, such as engineering, are charged by the hour because the work involved in these tasks is more predictable and we can accurately estimate in advance. Engineering services are always performed in-house, following productivity metrics we established over the years. On the other hand, since most of the translation work is outsourced, different translators have different throughput rates and per-word pricing encourages translators to maintain their skills and technology, since efficient translators effectively earn more per each working hour.
 

But why do you charge for project management?

Projects need to be managed, and this cost will always be included in the prices you pay, regardless of whether you hire a vendor or a freelance translator. Following our commitment to transparency, we prefer to show our customers exactly what they are paying for, instead of incorporating project management costs into another service.
 

Do you charge minimum fees?

The minimum fee is a fixed charge for very small projects to cover the operational work involved in the project. We try to avoid charging you minimum fees because we understand that every customer has different needs and we try to best adapt our processes to meet those demands. Make sure to discuss with your account manager about ways to make the whole process more flexible.
 

And what about rush fees?

Similarly to the minimum fee, we try to avoid charging rush (or express) fees to our customers. Instead, we prefer to negotiate the deadlines as we know that tight turnarounds can jeopardize the quality of the project. However, we understand that when time-to-market is essential, one cannot afford to wait for the average productivity rate of 2,000 words per day (Wait, have we just answered another question you had?) In these cases, we will allocate more resources to the project to increase that throughput.
 

You mentioned language assets. What does that mean?

Language assets are tools, documents and resources developed by Ccaps to guarantee text consistency. Whether they are glossaries, translation memories or customized style guides, language assets will always be the property of the customer for whom they were developed. You can choose to have a company-wide glossary or different glossaries for each department or product you localize. Likewise, the linguistic style guide is paramount to guarantee that your choices are being followed throughout the localized material. Ccaps provides a free standard Style Guide for the languages into which you translate. It contains our language preferences for a variety of guidelines based on industry standards. The Ccaps Style Guide instructs our translators on how to deal with acronyms, metrics, currencies, capitalization in titles, blacklists, etc. but it can also be customized to your preferences. Last but not least, in the list of language assets are your translation memories, but these deserve a topic of their own. See below.
 

Is translation memory a fancy name for machine translation?

No. While Machine Translation (MT) is performed exclusively by an automated engine, a translation memory (TM) is a database created with the help of a CAT tool, which stores the original segments and those translated by humans. These segments can be sentences, paragraphs or textual units previously translated and that will serve for three main purposes: increase the translator’s productivity, reduce costs in the long run and maintain the consistency of translations. The TM scans a new document to be translated and matches it with the segments it has stored, assigning a matching score to each unit. If a segment in the document is exactly the same as the one in the TM, then it is a 100% match segment, which is similar to a repetition. A No Match segment has a matching score below 75%, and anything between 75% and 100% is called a Fuzzy match. A discount on the full word rate is then applied to each matching level, which corresponds to the translation effort. Contact us to learn more about our discount matrix and how we can help you leverage this technology for your projects.
 

Back to the acronyms… What is a TMS?

A Translation Management System (TMS) manages the flow of global or regional content through the localization process via workflow automation. The benefits of using a TMS are similar to those of a Content Management System (CMS) with the added benefit of handling multilingual requirements: The automation of the localization workflow reduces management effort, overhead costs and time to market, while leveraging the talent and skills of all stakeholders. Team collaboration features and thorough reporting allow for seamless cooperation between headquarters and regional branches.
 

Wait, what is MT?

Machine translation is the automated translation of a text by a computer. On a basic level, MT performs simple substitution of words in one language for words in another, but that alone usually cannot produce a good translation of a text because recognition of whole phrases and their closest counterparts in the target language is needed.
 

And what about MT PE?

Since machine translation (MT) has not yet achieved a satisfactory quality level for most commercial translations, a common and good solution is to employ machine translation followed by post-editing (PE). The combination of these two processes guarantees a near-human-quality translation, while bringing significant savings to the translation project, especially when large volumes are involved.
 

Do you use Google Translator?

Never. Neither do we use it nor do we allow any of our translators to use it, as it is laid out in our vendor agreement. When you run content through Google Translator or use the Google Translation Toolkit, you are making your content freely available to Google. The following are two excerpts from the company’s Terms of Service that clearly define content property running through their services: “By submitting, posting or displaying the content you give Google a perpetual, irrevocable, worldwide, royalty-free, and non-exclusive license to reproduce, adapt, modify, translate, publish, publicly perform, publicly display and distribute any Content which you submit, post or display on or through, the Services. (…) You agree that this license includes a right for Google to make such Content available to other companies, organizations or individuals with whom Google has relationships for the provision of syndicated services, and to use such Content in connection with the provision of those services.” If you are considering using machine translation, contact us to learn more about best practices and how you can run an effective MT project with good quality while owning the content you translate, as opposed to when you use Google.
 

How do you make sure my confidential information is secure?

Ccaps is committed to protecting your privacy and intellectual property. Any information you share with us, including personal contact information, company and financial information will not be shared with third parties without a valid non-disclosure agreement (NDA) in place. The work we outsource is carefully managed with secure FTPs and dealt with by experienced professionals. For more information, please read our Privacy Statement.
 

Voice over, subtitling, dubbing and captioning… I am confused! Which one do I need?

When you use subtitles in a film, video or program, you present viewers with a transcript of the dialog, often displayed at the bottom of the screen. Also called captioning, it can display the translated script or the original version, since the audio portion of a video is only accessible to hearing impaired people when it includes captions. Captions are either open, when they are always in display, or closed, when they can be turned on and off by the viewer. Dubbing is a process whereby the translated script is mixed with original sound; the soundtrack and sound effects are kept but the actor voices are replaced with those of voice talents. Voice over is when talent voices are recorded over the original audio track, and the original actor voices can still be heard in the background. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages. Subtitling lets viewers read the translation and at the same time listen to the original actor’s voice but may be distracting if there is onscreen text (OST). While dubbing allows the audience to focus on the action, it is a costly, time-consuming and difficult process. Your choice will depend on the country for which you are localizing (some regions prefer to watch dubbed videos rather than original ones with subtitles), the genre and purpose of your video (entertainment vs. institutional, for example), and your budget, since costs for dubbing can be up to 15 times higher than subtitling.
 

What is the difference between consecutive, simultaneous and whispered interpreting?

In consecutive interpretation, the source-language speaker and the interpreter take turns speaking. The interpreter listens to the source-language speaker, and translates afterwards, when the source-language speaker pauses. Simultaneous interpretation is needed when there are various different languages to be interpreted into. In this case, interpreters sit in a professional soundproof booth, listening to the source-language and interpreting simultaneously into the target language, which is then transmitted into individual audio receptors for the foreign-language-speaking audience. Whispered interpreting (chuchotage) is when equipment for simultaneous interpretation is not available; one participant speaks and simultaneously an interpreter whispers into the ear of the one or maximum two people who require interpreting services.
 

How does telephone interpreting work?

During an Over-The-Phone Interpreting (OPI) session, when a caller dials in, our customer service representatives will take your call and your pre-assigned customer code. You will indicate the language you need and the representative will connect you with an interpreter for the requested language. Scheduled call service is available and can be helpful for those who would like to share documents with an interpreter, request a specific skill set, or need an interpreter for a language of limited diffusion (rare language). Scheduled calls ensure an interpreter will be ready and waiting at the scheduled time. This variant of interpreting services is recommended when the people engaging in a conversation who need an interpreter are not in the same room or when the duration of such conversation will be short as we only charge for the duration of the call.
 

Do you provide certified translations?

In Brazil, when you need a document for official purposes (i.e. immigration process, admission to university, etc.) you have to present a sworn translation to the appropriate authority or institution — which is different from a certified translation, valid in many other countries. Only a Public Translator and Commercial Interpreter (aka “Tradutor Juramentado”) duly certified by the local Trade Board can provide such translations, which shall be presented in hard copies and a printed statement at the end of the translation with the translator’s hand and seal of office. The original document (whether in digital format or hard copy) must accompany each translation with the translator’s initials and stamp. Despite of Brazil’s acceptance of the so-called “apostille system” sworn translations of public documents are still needed. While Ccaps is not entitled to execute sworn translations, we can manage your project and interface with the sworn translators with whom we work. Prices for such services are regulated by the local Trade Board, to which we will add a project management fee.
 
This FAQ will be updated as needed, but if you have any other questions or comments, just e-mail us!